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Poster: turnphilup Date: Jul 2, 2012 8:28am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Magic Trip>Merry Prankster>Millbrook>Mckenna

Just recently watched Magic Trip on Net-flicks. Great movie, and it made me think about my own psychedelic past. I feel I would have most diffidently felt more at ease hanging and tripping with the Kesey Klan. Later I became a Mckenna maniac and read everything he wrote and eventually met him and saw him speak. So, is there a camp you parked your psychedelic skull in?,and if so, which one? or which philosophy did you most admire or respect when it came to the use of psychedelic's if any? in your past and even today? Was it Kesey and crew? Leary and his bunch? Terence and the pysocibin machine elf's? no one? Peace. Oh yea, "Never trust a prankster."

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Poster: Dhamma1 Date: Jul 2, 2012 7:32pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Magic Trip>Merry Prankster>Millbrook>Mckenna

If forced to choose, I would say I was/am in the Leary-RamDass camp. I was first introduced to the subject by Huxley's books, and Alan Watts, and always took it seriously (pun intended) as a method of discovery. Wasn't primarily a recreational thing for me. There were cheaper and less potent substances for partying.

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Poster: capsgd Date: Jul 3, 2012 6:04pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Magic Trip>Merry Prankster>Millbrook>Mckenna

Fantasy fills in all of knowledge’s gaps, and not with coarse strokes but with the fine touches of a miniaturist.
-Uta Ranke-Heinemann
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Thinking transcends the distinction of subject and object. It produces these two concepts just as it produces all others.

We have forgotten that the concept of an object without a subject is as abstract as the concept of a surface without a depth and as futile as that of a back without a front.

Above all, we find that all words used to describe the “inside” of ourselves, whether it be a thought or feeling, can be clearly seen to have come down to us from an earlier period when they also had reference to the outside world.
-Owen Barfield